48 Hours in Malaga

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48 Hours in Malaga

On September 11, 2018, Posted by , In TEFL Blog, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on 48 Hours in Malaga

By Bart Lukkien – Marketing Internship at TEFL in Spain.

Sun, sea, sand, culture and excellent gastronomy is what you will find when in Malaga for your
Trinity CertTESOL course. The combination of endless winding alleys and bustling shopping streets
creates a historical, yet vivid atmosphere. With smooth car free paved streets, the city can be
explored calmly and pleasantly. But what is there to explore in the beautiful city of Málaga?

Historic City Centre
The historic city centre of Málaga is an iconic old town. The ancient narrow alleys all circulate
around “La Manquita”, the cathedral of Málaga. The cathedral received the name “La
Manquita” (One armed woman) due to her unfinished tower, but she is breathtakingly
beautiful regardless. For the shopaholics, the width and diversity of Calle Marques de Larios
will exceed all expectations!

La-Catedral-y-el-Palacio-Episcopal-de-Málaga-©Dan-flickr

 

Puerto de Málaga
The port of Málaga is the oldest continuously-used harbour in Spain and is a home to many visiting
cruise ships. However, the port is equally as stunning as it is useful. As it has been
modernised beautifully over the years and offers a great promenade along the
harbour front. Ending your walk at the Malagueta beach there is room for an ice cold
beverage and some traditional “Espetos Sardinas” (barbecued sardines), at one the many
restaurants called “Chiringuitos” that line the beach. This is a great place to come during your TEFL
course at TEFL in Spain to escape the assignments and soak up the atmosphere in Malaga.

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Pablo Picasso Museum
A visit to Málaga would not be complete without a stop at the Pablo Picasso Museum. This
museum was founded by the family of the well-known artist and outlines the life of Picasso
through his works. The exhibition can be described as versatile, surprising and refreshing
due to its rather unknown artworks. Furthermore, the museum is situated inside a traditional
palace dating all the way back to the 16 th century, creating a historic and mysterious
ambience.

Alcazaba
Last, but certainly not least, the Alcazaba in Málaga. This Moorish citadel has been a
favourite among tourists for years now, and there is no reason why it shouldn’t. The mixture
between eastern Arabic and roman influences provide a superb spectacle for everyone who
decides to visit the citadel. Arguably the best part about this experience is the view it offers
over the city and the port. Being built on the side of the Gibralfaro mountain, the citadel is located above the old city and provides stunning views of the old town.

Alcazaba_de_Málaga_4 (1)

 

Interested in becoming an accredited English teacher? Sign up for our Trinity CertTESOL course in
Malaga! See more information about the courses and dates here.

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